Topologically dissociable patterns of development of the human cerebral cortex.

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TitleTopologically dissociable patterns of development of the human cerebral cortex.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsVandekar, SN, Shinohara, RT, Raznahan, A, Roalf, DR, Ross, M, DeLeo, N, Ruparel, K, Verma, R, Wolf, DH, Gur, RC, Gur, RE, Satterthwaite, TD
JournalJ Neurosci
Volume35
Issue2
Pagination599-609
Date Published2015 Jan 14
ISSN1529-2401
KeywordsAdolescent, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex, Child, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Organ Specificity, White Matter, Young Adult
Abstract

Over 90 years ago, anatomists noted the cortex is thinner in sulci than gyri, suggesting that development may occur on a fine scale driven by local topology. However, studies of brain development in youth have focused on describing how cortical thickness varies over large-scale functional and anatomic regions. How the relationship between thickness and local sulcal topology arises in development is still not well understood. Here, we investigated the spatial relationships between cortical thickness, folding, and underlying white matter organization to elucidate the influence of local topology on human brain development. Our approach included using both T1-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in a cross-sectional sample of 932 youths ages 8-21 studied as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. Principal components analysis revealed separable development-related processes of regionally specific nonlinear cortical thickening (from ages 8-14) and widespread linear cortical thinning that have dissociable relationships with cortical topology. Whereas cortical thinning was most prominent in the depths of the sulci, early cortical thickening was present on the gyri. Furthermore, decline in mean diffusivity calculated from DTI in underlying white matter was correlated with cortical thinning, suggesting that cortical thinning is spatially associated with white matter development. Spatial permutation tests were used to assess the significance of these relationships. Together, these data demonstrate that cortical remodeling during youth occurs on a local topological scale and is associated with changes in white matter beneath the cortical surface.

DOI10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3628-14.2015
Alternate JournalJ. Neurosci.
PubMed ID25589754
PubMed Central IDPMC4293413
Grant ListT32 MH065218 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH089924 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH098130 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH101111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC2 MH089924 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K23MH098130 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K01 MH102609 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
T32MH065218-11 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
MH089983 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS085211 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01MH101111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01NS085211 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
RC2 MH089983 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K01MH102609 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
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