Timing of identification among children with an autism spectrum disorder: findings from a population-based surveillance study.

New CAR Research Sheds Light on

 

Universal Screening for Autism in Toddlers

TitleTiming of identification among children with an autism spectrum disorder: findings from a population-based surveillance study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsShattuck, PT, Durkin, M, Maenner, M, Newschaffer, C, Mandell, DS, Wiggins, L, Lee, L-C, Rice, C, Giarelli, E, Kirby, R, Baio, J, Pinto-Martin, J, Cuniff, C
JournalJ Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
Volume48
Issue5
Pagination474-483
Date Published2009 May
ISSN1527-5418
KeywordsAutistic Disorder, Child, Community Mental Health Services, Early Diagnosis, Female, Humans, Intellectual Disability, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Logistic Models, Male, Population Surveillance, Sex Factors, Time Factors
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: At what age are children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) identified by community providers? What factors influence the timing of when children are identified with ASDs? This study examined the timing of when children with ASDs are identified.METHOD: Data came from 13 sites participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2002 multisite ongoing autism surveillance program, the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network. Survival analysis was used to examine factors that influence the timing of community-based identification and diagnosis.RESULT: Data from health and education records reveal that the median age of identification was 5.7 years (SE 0.08 years). Parametric survival models revealed that several factors were associated with a younger age of identification: being male, having an IQ of 70 or lower, and having experienced developmental regression. Significant differences in the age of identification among the 13 sites were also discovered.CONCLUSIONS: The large gap between the age at which children can be identified and when they actually are identified suggests a critical need for further research, innovation, and improvement in this area of clinical practice.

DOI10.1097/CHI.0b013e31819b3848
Alternate JournalJ Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
PubMed ID19318992
PubMed Central IDPMC3188985
Grant ListUR3/DD000078 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
UR3 DD000078 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
T32 HD007489 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
UR3/CCU523235 / / PHS HHS / United States
P30 MH068579 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
T32 HD07489 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
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