The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED): a multisite epidemiologic study of autism by the Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) network.

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TitleThe Study to Explore Early Development (SEED): a multisite epidemiologic study of autism by the Centers for Autism and Developmental Disabilities Research and Epidemiology (CADDRE) network.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsSchendel, DE, DiGuiseppi, C, Croen, LA, M Fallin, D, Reed, PL, Schieve, LA, Wiggins, LD, Daniels, J, Grether, J, Levy, SE, Miller, L, Newschaffer, C, Pinto-Martin, J, Robinson, C, Windham, GC, Alexander, A, Aylsworth, AS, Bernal, P, Bonner, JD, Blaskey, L, Bradley, C, Collins, J, Ferretti, CJ, Farzadegan, H, Giarelli, E, Harvey, M, Hepburn, S, Herr, M, Kaparich, K, Landa, R, Lee, L-C, Levenseller, B, Meyerer, S, Rahbar, MH, Ratchford, A, Reynolds, A, Rosenberg, S, Rusyniak, J, Shapira, SK, Smith, K, Souders, M, Thompson, PAaron, Young, L, Yeargin-Allsopp, M
JournalJ Autism Dev Disord
Volume42
Issue10
Pagination2121-40
Date Published2012 Oct
ISSN1573-3432
KeywordsAutistic Disorder, Case-Control Studies, Child, Preschool, Developmental Disabilities, Female, Humans, Male, Parents, Phenotype, Prevalence, Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract

The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED), a multisite investigation addressing knowledge gaps in autism phenotype and etiology, aims to: (1) characterize the autism behavioral phenotype and associated developmental, medical, and behavioral conditions and (2) investigate genetic and environmental risks with emphasis on immunologic, hormonal, gastrointestinal, and sociodemographic characteristics. SEED uses a case-control design with population-based ascertainment of children aged 2-5 years with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and children in two control groups-one from the general population and one with non-ASD developmental problems. Data from parent-completed questionnaires, interviews, clinical evaluations, biospecimen sampling, and medical record abstraction focus on the prenatal and early postnatal periods. SEED is a valuable resource for testing hypotheses regarding ASD characteristics and causes.

DOI10.1007/s10803-012-1461-8
Alternate JournalJ Autism Dev Disord
PubMed ID22350336
PubMed Central IDPMC4455890
Grant ListU10DD000184 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
U10DD000181 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
U01 DD001210 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
CC999999 / / Intramural CDC HHS / United States
U10DD000182 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
U10DD000498 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
U10DD000183 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
U10DD000180 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States
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