A Multimodal Study of the Contributions of Conduction Velocity to the Auditory Evoked Neuromagnetic Response: Anomalies in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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TitleA Multimodal Study of the Contributions of Conduction Velocity to the Auditory Evoked Neuromagnetic Response: Anomalies in Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsRoberts, TPL, Bloy, L, Ku, M, Blaskey, L, Jackel, CR, Edgar, JChristophe, Berman, JI
JournalAutism Res
Volume13
Issue10
Pagination1730-1745
Date Published2020 Oct
ISSN1939-3806
Abstract

This multimodal imaging study used magnetoencephalography, diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to identify and contrast the multiple physiological mechanisms associated with auditory processing efficiency in typically developing (TD) children and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Efficient transmission of auditory input between the ear and auditory cortex is necessary for rapid encoding of auditory sensory information. It was hypothesized that the M50 auditory evoked response latency would be modulated by white matter microstructure (indexed by diffusion MRI) and by tonic inhibition (indexed by GABA MRS). Participants were 77 children diagnosed with ASD and 40 TD controls aged 7-17 years. A model of M50 latency with auditory radiation fractional anisotropy and age as independent variables was able to predict 52% of M50 latency variance in TD children, but only 12% of variance in ASD. The ASD group exhibited altered patterns of M50 latency modulation characterized by both higher variance and deviation from the expected structure-function relationship established with the TD group. The TD M50 latency model was used to identify a subpopulation of ASD who are significant "outliers" to the TD model. The ASD outlier group exhibited unexpectedly long M50 latencies in conjunction with significantly lower GABA levels. These findings indicate the dependence of electrophysiologic sensory response latency on underlying microstructure (white matter) and neurochemistry (synaptic activity). This study demonstrates the use of biologically based measures to stratify ASD according to their brain-level "building blocks" as an alternative to their behavioral phenotype. LAY SUMMARY: Children with ASD often have a slower brain response when hearing sounds. This study used multiple brain imaging techniques to examine the structural and neurochemical factors which control the brain's response time to auditory tones in children with ASD and TD children. The relationship between brain imaging measures and brain response time was also used to identify ASD subgroups. Autism Res 2020, 13: 1730-1745. © 2020 International Society for Autism Research and Wiley Periodicals LLC.

DOI10.1002/aur.2369
Alternate JournalAutism Res
PubMed ID32924333
Grant ListU54-HD086984 / / National Institute of Child Health and Human Development /
R01MH107506 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R21-MH110869 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01-DC008871 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01-HD073258 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
W81XWH-15-1-0354 / / U.S. Department of Defense /
R01MH107506 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R21-MH110869 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01-DC008871 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01-HD073258 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States