Long-term trajectory of cognitive performance in people with bipolar disorder and controls: 6-year longitudinal study.

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TitleLong-term trajectory of cognitive performance in people with bipolar disorder and controls: 6-year longitudinal study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsSparding, T, Joas, E, Clements, C, Sellgren, CM, Pålsson, E, Landén, M
JournalBJPsych Open
Volume7
Issue4
Paginatione115
Date Published2021 Jun 18
ISSN2056-4724
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional studies have found impaired cognitive functioning in patients with bipolar disorder, but long-term longitudinal studies are scarce.

AIMS: The aims of this study were to examine the 6-year longitudinal course of cognitive functioning in patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Subsets of patients were examined to investigate possible differences in cognitive trajectories.

METHOD: Patients with bipolar I disorder (n = 44) or bipolar II disorder (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 59) were tested with a comprehensive cognitive test battery at baseline and retested after 6 years. We conducted repeated measures ANCOVAs with group as a between-subject factor and tested the significance of group and time interaction.

RESULTS: By and large, the change in cognitive functioning between baseline and follow-up did not differ significantly between participants with bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Comparing subsets of patients, for example those with bipolar I and II disorder and those with and without manic episodes during follow-up, did not reveal subgroups more vulnerable to cognitive decline.

CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive performance remained stable in patients with bipolar disorder over a 6-year period and evolved similarly to healthy controls. These findings argue against the notion of a general progressive decline in cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder.

DOI10.1192/bjo.2021.66
Alternate JournalBJPsych Open
PubMed ID34140054
PubMed Central IDPMC8240122