Influence of family demographic factors on social communication questionnaire scores.

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TitleInfluence of family demographic factors on social communication questionnaire scores.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsRosenberg, SA, Moody, EJ, Lee, L-C, DiGuiseppi, C, Windham, GC, Wiggins, LD, Schieve, LA, Ledbetter, CM, Levy, SE, Blaskey, L, Young, L, Bernal, P, Rosenberg, CR, M Fallin, D
JournalAutism Res
Date Published2018 Feb 09
ISSN1939-3806
Abstract

This study examined the effect of demographic factors on Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) scores in children aged 30-68 months. Diagnoses of ASD were made after a gold standard evaluation that included the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), and the Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised (ADI-R). The relationship of demographic variables to SCQ scores was compared in two source populations: (a) children recruited from clinical and educational sources serving children who have ASD or other developmental disorders (CE) and (b) children recruited from birth certificates to represent the general population (BC). The impact of the demographic variables-child sex, child age, maternal language, maternal ethnicity, maternal education, maternal race, and household income-on total SCQ score were studied to examine their impact on the SCQ's performance. Demographic factors predicting the SCQ total score were used to generate ROCs. Factors that had a significant influence on SCQ performance were identified by examining the area under the ROCs. Optimal SCQ cut-points were generated for significant factors using the Youden's Index. Overall male sex, lower household income, lower maternal education and Black race predicted higher SCQ scores. In this sample, the most common optimum value for the SCQ cut-point across the different sociodemographic groups was 11. Autism Res 2018. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

LAY SUMMARY: Screeners are used to help identify children who are more likely to have ASD than their peers. Ideally screeners should be accurate for different groups of children and families. This study examined how well the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) predicts ASD. We found that male sex, lower household income, lower maternal education and Black race were associated with higher SCQ scores. In this study an SCQ cut-point of 11 worked best across the different sociodemographic groups in our sample.

DOI10.1002/aur.1935
Alternate JournalAutism Res
PubMed ID29424959
Grant ListU01 DD001210 / DD / NCBDD CDC HHS / United States