Functional connectivity of the inferior frontal cortex changes with age in children with autism spectrum disorders: a fcMRI study of response inhibition.

We just began a large new study on
Autism, ADHD, Anxiety & Depression in 12-17 year-olds.
Read more and learn how you can help!

TitleFunctional connectivity of the inferior frontal cortex changes with age in children with autism spectrum disorders: a fcMRI study of response inhibition.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsLee, PS, Yerys, BE, Rosa, ADella, Foss-Feig, J, Barnes, KAnne, James, JD, VanMeter, J, Vaidya, CJ, Gaillard, WD, Kenworthy, LE
JournalCereb Cortex
Volume19
Issue8
Pagination1787-94
Date Published2009 Aug
ISSN1460-2199
KeywordsAge Factors, Analysis of Variance, Autistic Disorder, Cerebral Cortex, Child, Cognition Disorders, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Language Tests, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Net, Neuropsychological Tests
Abstract

Unmasking the neural basis of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD), requires studying functional connectivity during childhood when cognitive skills develop. A functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) analysis was performed on data collected during Go/NoGo task performance from 24 children ages 8-12 years (12 with ASD; 12 controls matched on age and intellectual functioning). We investigated the connectivity of the left and right inferior frontal cortex (IFC; BA 47), key regions for response inhibition, with other active regions in frontal, striatal, and parietal cortex. Groups did not differ on behavioral measures or functional connectivity of either IFC region. A trend for reduced connectivity in the right IFC for the ASD group was revealed when controlling for age. In the ASD group, there was a significant negative correlation between age and 2 right IFC correlation pairs: right IFC-bilateral presupplementary motor area (BA 6) and right IFC-right caudate. Compared with typical controls, children with ASD may not have gross differences in IFC functional connectivity during response inhibition, which contrasts with an adult study of ASD that reported reduced functional connectivity. This discrepancy suggests an atypical developmental trajectory in ASD for right IFC connectivity with other neural regions supporting response inhibition.

DOI10.1093/cercor/bhn209
Alternate JournalCereb. Cortex
PubMed ID19068486
PubMed Central IDPMC2722789
Grant ListM01-RR13297 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P30HD40677 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
T32HD046388 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 MH066417 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
Comments
Leave a Comment