Dissociable changes in functional network topology underlie early category learning and development of automaticity.

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TitleDissociable changes in functional network topology underlie early category learning and development of automaticity.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsSoto, FA, Bassett, DS, F Ashby, G
JournalNeuroimage
Volume141
Pagination220-241
Date Published2016 Nov 01
ISSN1095-9572
KeywordsBrain, Female, Humans, Learning, Male, Nerve Net, Neuronal Plasticity, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Reflex, Young Adult
Abstract

Recent work has shown that multimodal association areas-including frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex-are focal points of functional network reconfiguration during human learning and performance of cognitive tasks. On the other hand, neurocomputational theories of category learning suggest that the basal ganglia and related subcortical structures are focal points of functional network reconfiguration during early learning of some categorization tasks but become less so with the development of automatic categorization performance. Using a combination of network science and multilevel regression, we explore how changes in the connectivity of small brain regions can predict behavioral changes during training in a visual categorization task. We find that initial category learning, as indexed by changes in accuracy, is predicted by increasingly efficient integrative processing in subcortical areas, with higher functional specialization, more efficient integration across modules, but a lower cost in terms of redundancy of information processing. The development of automaticity, as indexed by changes in the speed of correct responses, was predicted by lower clustering (particularly in subcortical areas), higher strength (highest in cortical areas), and higher betweenness centrality. By combining neurocomputational theories and network scientific methods, these results synthesize the dissociative roles of multimodal association areas and subcortical structures in the development of automaticity during category learning.

DOI10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.07.032
Alternate JournalNeuroimage
PubMed ID27453156
PubMed Central IDPMC5026970
Grant ListR01 DC009209 / DC / NIDCD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HD086888 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH063760 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R21 MH106799 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States