Default mode network segregation and social deficits in autism spectrum disorder: Evidence from non-medicated children.

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TitleDefault mode network segregation and social deficits in autism spectrum disorder: Evidence from non-medicated children.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsYerys, BE, Gordon, EM, Abrams, DN, Satterthwaite, TD, Weinblatt, R, Jankowski, KF, Strang, J, Kenworthy, L, Gaillard, WD, Vaidya, CJ
JournalNeuroimage Clin
Volume9
Pagination223-32
Date Published2015
ISSN2213-1582
KeywordsAdolescent, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Brain, Brain Mapping, Case-Control Studies, Child, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Models, Neurological, Nerve Net, Neural Pathways, Oxygen, Social Behavior Disorders
Abstract

Functional pathology of the default mode network is posited to be central to social-cognitive impairment in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Altered functional connectivity of the default mode network's midline core may be a potential endophenotype for social deficits in ASD. Generalizability from prior studies is limited by inclusion of medicated participants and by methods favoring restricted examination of network function. This study measured resting-state functional connectivity in 22 8-13 year-old non-medicated children with ASD and 22 typically developing controls using seed-based and network segregation functional connectivity methods. Relative to controls the ASD group showed both under- and over-functional connectivity within default mode and non-default mode regions, respectively. ASD symptoms correlated negatively with the connection strength of the default mode midline core-medial prefrontal cortex-posterior cingulate cortex. Network segregation analysis with the participation coefficient showed a higher area under the curve for the ASD group. Our findings demonstrate that the default mode network in ASD shows a pattern of poor segregation with both functional connectivity metrics. This study confirms the potential for the functional connection of the midline core as an endophenotype for social deficits. Poor segregation of the default mode network is consistent with an excitation/inhibition imbalance model of ASD.

DOI10.1016/j.nicl.2015.07.018
Alternate JournalNeuroimage Clin
PubMed ID26484047
PubMed Central IDPMC4573091
Grant ListU54 MH066417 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P30 HD026979 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
P30 HD040677 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH086111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH084961 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K23MH086111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P30HD026979 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01MH084961 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
U54MH066417 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P30HD40677 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 HD086984 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
M01RR020359 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
M01 RR020359 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
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