Common variation contributes to the genetic architecture of social communication traits.

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TitleCommon variation contributes to the genetic architecture of social communication traits.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsSt Pourcain, B, Whitehouse, AJO, Ang, WQ, Warrington, NM, Glessner, JT, Wang, K, Timpson, NJ, Evans, DM, Kemp, JP, Ring, SM, McArdle, WL, Golding, J, Hakonarson, H, Pennell, CE, Smith, GDavey
JournalMol Autism
Volume4
Issue1
Pagination34
Date Published2013 Sep 18
ISSN2040-2392
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Social communication difficulties represent an autistic trait that is highly heritable and persistent during the course of development. However, little is known about the underlying genetic architecture of this phenotype.METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study on parent-reported social communication problems using items of the children's communication checklist (age 10 to 11 years) studying single and/or joint marker effects. Analyses were conducted in a large UK population-based birth cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and their Children, ALSPAC, N = 5,584) and followed-up within a sample of children with comparable measures from Western Australia (RAINE, N = 1364).RESULTS: Two of our seven independent top signals (P-discovery <1.0E-05) were replicated (0.009 CONCLUSION: Overall, our study provides both joint and single-SNP-based evidence for the contribution of common polymorphisms to variation in social communication phenotypes.

DOI10.1186/2040-2392-4-34
Alternate JournalMol Autism
PubMed ID24047820
PubMed Central IDPMC3853437
Grant ListMC_UU_12013/3 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_PC_15018 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
MC_UU_12013/4 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
G9815508 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
U01 HG006830 / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
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