Common Dimensional Reward Deficits Across Mood and Psychotic Disorders: A Connectome-Wide Association Study.

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TitleCommon Dimensional Reward Deficits Across Mood and Psychotic Disorders: A Connectome-Wide Association Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsSharma, A, Wolf, DH, Ciric, R, Kable, JW, Moore, TM, Vandekar, SN, Katchmar, N, Daldal, A, Ruparel, K, Davatzikos, C, Elliott, MA, Calkins, ME, Shinohara, RT, Bassett, DS, Satterthwaite, TD
JournalAm J Psychiatry
Volume174
Issue7
Pagination657-666
Date Published2017 07 01
ISSN1535-7228
KeywordsAdult, Anhedonia, Bipolar Disorder, Brain, Brain Mapping, Connectome, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mesencephalon, Middle Aged, Mood Disorders, Nerve Net, Nucleus Accumbens, Psychotic Disorders, Reward, Schizophrenia, Schizophrenic Psychology, Ventral Striatum, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Anhedonia is central to multiple psychiatric disorders and causes substantial disability. A dimensional conceptualization posits that anhedonia severity is related to a transdiagnostic continuum of reward deficits in specific neural networks. Previous functional connectivity studies related to anhedonia have focused on case-control comparisons in specific disorders, using region-specific seed-based analyses. Here, the authors explore the entire functional connectome in relation to reward responsivity across a population of adults with heterogeneous psychopathology.METHOD: In a sample of 225 adults from five diagnostic groups (major depressive disorder, N=32; bipolar disorder, N=50; schizophrenia, N=51; psychosis risk, N=39; and healthy control subjects, N=53), the authors conducted a connectome-wide analysis examining the relationship between a dimensional measure of reward responsivity (the reward sensitivity subscale of the Behavioral Activation Scale) and resting-state functional connectivity using multivariate distance-based matrix regression.RESULTS: The authors identified foci of dysconnectivity associated with reward responsivity in the nucleus accumbens, the default mode network, and the cingulo-opercular network. Follow-up analyses revealed dysconnectivity among specific large-scale functional networks and their connectivity with the nucleus accumbens. Reward deficits were associated with decreased connectivity between the nucleus accumbens and the default mode network and increased connectivity between the nucleus accumbens and the cingulo-opercular network. In addition, impaired reward responsivity was associated with default mode network hyperconnectivity and diminished connectivity between the default mode network and the cingulo-opercular network.CONCLUSIONS: These results emphasize the centrality of the nucleus accumbens in the pathophysiology of reward deficits and suggest that dissociable patterns of connectivity among large-scale networks are critical to the neurobiology of reward dysfunction across clinical diagnostic categories.

DOI10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.16070774
Alternate JournalAm J Psychiatry
PubMed ID28135847
PubMed Central IDPMC5495611
Grant ListT32 MH019112 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 EB022573 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
T32 MH065218 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH098130 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R21 MH106799 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH101111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 HD086888 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
K23 MH085096 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS085211 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH107703 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States