Common and dissociable regional cerebral blood flow differences associate with dimensions of psychopathology across categorical diagnoses.

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TitleCommon and dissociable regional cerebral blood flow differences associate with dimensions of psychopathology across categorical diagnoses.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsKaczkurkin, AN, Moore, TM, Calkins, ME, Ciric, R, Detre, JA, Elliott, MA, Foa, EB, A de la Garza, G, Roalf, DR, Rosen, A, Ruparel, K, Shinohara, RT, Xia, CH, Wolf, DH, Gur, RE, Gur, RC, Satterthwaite, TD
JournalMol Psychiatry
Volume23
Issue10
Pagination1981-1989
Date Published2018 10
ISSN1476-5578
KeywordsAdolescent, Biomarkers, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Child, Female, Gyrus Cinguli, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mental Disorders, Philadelphia, Psychopathology, Young Adult
Abstract

The high comorbidity among neuropsychiatric disorders suggests a possible common neurobiological phenotype. Resting-state regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) can be measured noninvasively with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and abnormalities in regional CBF are present in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Regional CBF may also provide a useful biological marker across different types of psychopathology. To investigate CBF changes common across psychiatric disorders, we capitalized upon a sample of 1042 youths (ages 11-23 years) who completed cross-sectional imaging as part of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. CBF at rest was quantified on a voxelwise basis using arterial spin labeled perfusion MRI at 3T. A dimensional measure of psychopathology was constructed using a bifactor model of item-level data from a psychiatric screening interview, which delineated four factors (fear, anxious-misery, psychosis and behavioral symptoms) plus a general factor: overall psychopathology. Overall psychopathology was associated with elevated perfusion in several regions including the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and left rostral ACC. Furthermore, several clusters were associated with specific dimensions of psychopathology. Psychosis symptoms were related to reduced perfusion in the left frontal operculum and insula, whereas fear symptoms were associated with less perfusion in the right occipital/fusiform gyrus and left subgenual ACC. Follow-up functional connectivity analyses using resting-state functional MRI collected in the same participants revealed that overall psychopathology was associated with decreased connectivity between the dorsal ACC and bilateral caudate. Together, the results of this study demonstrate common and dissociable CBF abnormalities across neuropsychiatric disorders in youth.

DOI10.1038/mp.2017.174
Alternate JournalMol. Psychiatry
PubMed ID28924181
PubMed Central IDPMC5858960
Grant ListP50 MH096891 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K08 MH079364 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH112070 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P41 EB015893 / EB / NIBIB NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH101111 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC2 MH089924 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K01 MH102609 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS085211 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH107703 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
RC2 MH089983 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
K12 HD085848 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States